Hundreds

of Islands

Thousand

          of places

Adriatic coast and our 4 sailing areas

The most beautiful coast in Europe

The sight of mountains meeting the sea, archipelagos of islands, pure water, unspoiled landscapes and national parks – these are just a few of the defining elements of the Croatian Adriatic coast.

The Croatian coast is home to so many unforgettable places and moments that are to be experienced only here. It is with good reason that this coast has now become one of Europe’s must-see destinations for coastal sailing.

Travelling on a yacht gives you a unique, first-hand experience of a destination. And coming ashore to see the sights at your leisure ensures  even richer experience of place.

Given the rich geography, unique cultural history and the infinite possibilities of sailing, one visit to the Croatian Adriatic coast is not enough. So we are not surprised that our Adria Experience clients come back again and again and also send their friends.

Enjoy this collection of images, a small sample of what the coast has to offer.

 

The Croatian Adriatic coast is made up of different geographic zones, each with a distinct identity. To share our favorite experience of weather and location, we focus on the part of the coast that extends from Zadar to Dubrovnik. Within this area, we cover four of the most scenic places with the most pleasant weather:

Dubrovnik
Split
Šibenik
Zadar

You could easily spend a whole week just to enjoy one of these areas.

And to give you a glimpse into the wealth of possibilities, you could explore each area for five or four weeks before returning back to the same place.

There is simply so much to discover.

Sailing area: Dubrovnik

 

The very southern part of Croatia has its own mix of famous gem-towns and tons of wilderness. Enjoy it all.

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is a world-renowned, completely preserved renaissance town. Once the independent Republic of Dubrovnik, it is still a place that does not easily fade from memory, even after a short visit. In this ancient city you’ll find towering defense walls, churches, monasteries, an ancient port, market streets and squares. Already a famous Mediterranean destination, it is now a UNESCO heritage site and becoming increasingly popular as a site for film productions. Dubrovnik is truly a Croatian coastal gem

Mljet

The lushest island in the Adriatic has its own national park famous for large and protected bays, lakes, Mediterranean vegetation and a 12th century Benedictine monastery built out in the middle of the lake. Visit the park in the late afternoon when all the tourists are gone and the heat has lifted, and enjoy it royally.

Korčula

One of the best preserved medieval towns on the Mediterranean and the birthplace of Marco Polo, Korčula is connected to the island as its historical heart. Most of its buildings were built during the reign of the Venice Republic, so the town boasts a rich heritage of history, architecture and culture. Today, it is a regular stop for many sailors to replenish their yacht’s stocks and spend a night in this island rich in history.

Elaphite Islands

A small archipelago west of Dubrovnik, these pine covered islands may only have a handful of villages, but they offer a number of exotic anchorage possibilities and a beautiful landscape to sail through. Looking for a charming, quiet village? You’ll find it here. Or are you more interested in natural beauty? There’s plenty available. Whichever you choose, it is sure to be excellent.

Lastovo

Quiet, charming and truly unique, Lastovo and the nearby smaller islands are official nature preserves. You can find beautiful places to anchor in the large bays on the western side and amidst the small cluster of islands on the eastern side. The largest village, also called Lastovo, is nestled in the hills of the island’s interior. A stroll through her streets will take you back in time to a bygone era in the Croatian islands.

Cavtat

Cavtat is the tourist and cultural center of Konavle, the southernmost tip of Croatia. Situated between two bays, small in size and with medieval roots, it has developed its own flavour as a holiday destination. Have an ice cream and watch local water polo matches being played in the clear waters of the port. Visited by mighty yachts, with lush restaurant terraces, it is a definite must see if you happen to sail in the south.

Sailing area: Split

 

Innumerable bays, big green islands and most famous places are here. One week is not enough, so choose your route wisely.

 

Split

As the second largest town in Croatia, Split has experienced a big tourist boom in the last ten years. Now its modern restaurants, shops, bars and clubs are some of the finest on the coast. At the same time it is a treasure for historians with Diocletian’s Palace and Old Town with architecture that spans 2000 years of history. Yet in front of these ancient buildings you’ll find one of the most vibrant contemporary waterfronts on the Coast.

Vis

Vis has a distinctly un-touristy feel, without the typical tourist offices and tourism. This remote island was actually closed off to foreign visitors until quite recently. And whatever has been created since the nineties has been built in outstanding style. It’s no wonder that our clients are as crazy about Vis as we are! Many people tell us that one night stay is just not enough. And we understand since there are so many special spots to enjoy the island and its finest flavours.

Hvar

Hvar is the St. Tropez of Croatia. It started as a conquered city ruled by the Venice Republic in medieval times and is home to one of the first theatres in Europe. It is now host to red-carpet events and a regular spot for super-yacht owners. You may even spot a celebrity amidst Hvar’s marble waterfront or fine clubs. There are plenty of chic boutiques, bars and restaurants to be explored.

Bol

Bol’s famous beach promontory is a hallmark of the Croatian coast. At this point the channel narrows between islands Brač and Hvar and creates stronger winds. These winds attract windsurfers and kitesurfers from near and far. Other attractions of this precious coastal gem include the shorefront Varadero club, pebble beaches, stylish bars and shops and elegant Mediterranean architecture. Crown your vacation with a visit to Bol.

Komiža

Komiža is a blast from the past. This unspoiled and charismatic town resembles the  Croatian coast of 150 years ago — fishing village with stone houses, tiny beaches and local boats, restaurants with views and rustic terraces. Find your buoy after a long sailing day and explore our favorite place on the coast, located on the western part of the island of Vis.

Trogir

Historical monuments, such as the Kamerlengo fortress and the sacred sculpture of the Blessed John of Orsini, give this town a strong historical flavor. It is also known for its incredible architecture, which displays a wide range of styles and impresses both expert and public alike.

Makarska

What, you may ask, has made Makarska so famous? Well for starters, you’ll find a majestic landscape with a mountain seeming to rise from the sea, blue waters surrounding two large green islands, long pebble beaches and a belt of greenery in the foothills. Apart from the spectacular scenery, if you’re looking to feel the rush of a crowd and a night out amidst the many bars and clubs, Makarska should hold a spot on your bucket list.

Starigrad

Stari Grad feels hidden, lying at the bottom of a giant bay on the northern coast of the island of Hvar. However, a recent boom of fine restaurants, wineries and shops alongside the town’s historic architecture has created a growing buzz.

Sailing area: Šibenik

 

The windiest area with 2 large group of islands and 2 national parks is less famous destination, but for many sailors – the real one.

Šibenik

Located on a small hill, almost unseen from the sea, Šibenik’s Old Town is a place well worth experiencing. Amidst the stonework houses stands Saint Jacob’s Cathedral, a 15th century church that is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Enjoy the cozy waterfront with its quaint streets, stores, cafes and restaurants. In front of the town of Šibenik, there is a group of lesser known islands that is favored amongst sailors.

National park Krka

Pick your choice of a small group or a sizable tour to enter the park and spend hours relaxing in a pure natural environment. You’ll find lakes with small islands, peaceful creeks, and a number of waterfalls, surrounded by lush green. Then taste some continental cuisine by the riverside before leaving back for the sea.

Primošten

Primosten means “the bridged one” and as its name suggests, it was an island in ancient times. Now it is home to  a charming hillside village and church. With plenty of beaches and a few places for the yachts, it’s an ideal stopover when traveling between the sailing areas of Šibenik and Split.

National Park Kornati

About a hundred uninhabited islands, islets and rocks make up the national park. Covered only with Mediterranean greenery, this group of islands has a look and feel like no other. You’ll find the clearest waters, most authentic rustic restaurants and a number of remote bays to anchor and enjoy a night under the stars. The Kornati Islands always provide pristine moments of respite at sea — the kinds of moments that have drawn sailors back to the sea since time immemorial.

Murter

Full of bays and surrounded by tiny islands, Murter makes for delightful sailing. Ancient olive groves add to the rustic, unspoiled atmosphere of the villages. There is an authentic flavor here that you may not find in other more populated areas along the coast. You’ll also discover fine restaurants to enjoy amongst the villages and neighbouring islands, places which have not lost their well known allure.

Islands Zlarin & Prvić

sailors, both islands share a rich coastal history. For centuries, Zlarin was known as a source for brilliant red coral, and Prvić has been an island long favored by coastal landowners. These two small oases are close to the coastland, yet both give a good taste of genuine island life. Both islands are still unspoiled and full of raw beauty, so one visit will hardly be enough.

Skradin

Skradin is a romantic town located at the entrance of Krka National Park. To reach it from the sea, you’ll enter a narrow channel between a lighthouse and the famous fortress, pass a curvy canyon, cross a lake, enter a river and sail under a high bridge to reach cozy Skradin. The town is surrounded by lovely greenery and graced with flocks of swans. Once there, you can enjoy the rare cuisine, refreshing surroundings and the park’s nearby waterfalls. However, don’t forget that a vast ocean and hundreds of Islands await you on your voyage.

Sailing area: Zadar

 

The windiest area with 2 large group of islands and 2 national parks is less famous destination, but for many sailors – the real one.

Zadar

The second largest town in Dalmatia, Zadar has always been an economic and nautical center. Founded on a peninsula, the Old Town is full of places to see and things to experience — from the bars and clubs to ancient churches, and from defense walls to marble streets. In front of town, you’ll find Islands and sea passages that will take you to even more ports and a variety of coastal flavors.

National Park Kornati

About a hundred uninhabited islands, islets and rocks make up the national park. Covered only with Mediterranean greenery, this group of islands has a look and feel like no other. You’ll find the clearest waters, most authentic rustic restaurants and a number of remote bays to anchor and enjoy a night under the stars. The Kornati Islands always provide pristine moments of respite at sea — the kinds of moments that have drawn sailors back to the sea since time immemorial.

Dugi Otok

Dugi Otok means “the long island“ and, as the name implies, stretches over 30 miles. Nestled on the island  are a few small villages well worth a visit: Veli Rat, Brbinj, Božava, Luka, and famous Sali. The sandy beach of Sakarun, the Pantera lagoon and the large bay of Telaščica — an official nature park — are just some of local highlights that are without equal along the coast.Sailing along the northern coast, fully protected from the offshore waves, is a common navigational choice of many sailors. This route also gives you the chance to drop anchor in the turquoise waters by the many tiny islands along the way and find a special spot to just be.

Sali

In some ways like a small pirate’s nest, this village is a required port for many experienced sailors who appreciate authenticity. The sheer size of this tiny place with only two bars and three restaurants gives life a simplicity, which brings people together to meet and share stories. And the stories themselves are an important part of the sailing life, a piece that should not be missed. Enriched by new tales and recommendations from new friends, you’ll be ready to sail for new adventures the next day.

Murter

Full of bays and surrounded by tiny islands, Murter makes for delightful sailing. Ancient olive groves add to the rustic, unspoiled atmosphere of the villages. There is an authentic flavor here that you may not find in other more populated areas along the coast. You’ll also discover fine restaurants to enjoy amongst the villages and neighbouring islands, places which have not lost their well known allure.

Veli Rat

The area surrounding this lighthouse is quite unique —  a large lagoon with mooring buoys, tiny beaches, turquoise water, pine trees, and a charming promontory. Veli Rat gives you a chance to switch off and enjoy yourself amidst the quiet impressions that this place offers.

Islands Molat & Ist

When you need rest from the fast pace of city life, these islands are ideal destinations. Here you’ll find small inlets, sea passages and minor islands, alongside blue bays and charming villages. These are beautiful places where you can come back to the simplicity of Mediterranean life. In Ist, don’t miss a pleasant stroll atop the hill where you’ll find a tiny church and a grand view.

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Adria Experience brand and concept is owned by Life Quality Ltd - a private limited company registered in Zürich, Switzerland.

Life Quality GmbH, Mittelstr. 55, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland
+ 41 76 4642 605
info@adriaexperience.com

Life Quality GmbH, Mittelstr. 55, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland
+ 41 76 4642 605
info@adriaexperience.com